France, Denmark and Spain fail to implement ban on fish discards – new studies


France, Denmark and Spain are failing to implement the EU ban on fish discards, threatening European fish shares and the well being of our ocean.

Our ocean attorneys have in the present day launched studies displaying that the three nations, all with main fishing industries, haven’t adequately enforced the ‘touchdown obligation’ or punished law-breakers.

ClientEarth Fisheries lawyer Elisabeth Druel stated: “So long as discarding continues, we won’t know what number of fish are being killed at sea. With out this knowledge, scientists can not make the best estimates to guard our fish shares.

“Discarding may end up in the pointless loss of life of tens of millions of tonnes of fish yearly. That is disastrous for fish shares, our ocean ecosystem and the fishing business.”

The duty to land all catches was launched in 2013 to cease undesirable fish being thrown overboard and to push operators to place in place extra selective fishing strategies.

Nearly two million tonnes of fish and different marine animals are estimated to be thrown again into the ocean every year. That is massively wasteful, and makes it virtually unimaginable to precisely measure the well being of fish shares in European waters.

The phasing-in interval began in 2015, and the discard ban grew to become obligatory for all EU nations in January 2019.

At this time’s studies present that Denmark, France and Spain don’t have the correct means to manage discards, or mechanisms to account for all catches, together with discards.

The dearth of sanctions within the three nations in 2017 and 2018 additionally signifies that the discard ban just isn’t being correctly enforced. In that interval:

“So long as discarding continues, we won’t know what number of fish are being killed at sea. With out this knowledge, scientists can not make the best estimates to guard our fish shares.”
  • Spain reported no infringements;
  • The Danish Fisheries company discovered solely three infringements; and,
  • French authorities utilized no sanctions.

Druel added: “Some very concrete options exist to make sure that no fish is discarded, together with equipping fishing vessels with distant digital monitoring system like CCTV or web sensors. We encourage all public authorities to undertake these instruments and apply sanctions to cease fish discards.”

The most recent figures present that Spanish fishers account for 21% of the general EU fleet by way of capability, and France accounts for 11%. Denmark, one of many largest fishing nations in Europe, is at the moment going through an EU infringement process for failing to correctly management fishing practices, and for unlawful misreporting catches.

 

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